Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada

2019-20

Departmental Results Report

The Honourable David Lametti, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada

represented by the Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs (FJA) Canada, 2020

Catalogue No. J41-5E-PDF

ISSN 2561-2778



Commissioner’s message

 

I am pleased to submit the Departmental Results Report for the Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada (FJA) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020. This report provides parliamentarians and Canadians with information regarding what we accomplished and achieved in the last year.

FJA strives to safeguard the independence of the judiciary through various means, including its administration of Part I of the Judges Act (the Act). Amongst other things this past year, we also supported the process that led to the appointment of a new judge to the Supreme Court of Canada, issued new guidelines regarding allowances under the Act, and, through the work of our Finance, IT and other personnel, configured our systems and updated policies and procedures in order to meet the requirements of Bill C-58, An Act to amend the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

Core services in the areas of Finance and Compensation and Benefits were delivered to more than 1260 federally appointed judges. As well, we provided language training to judges enrolled in our program, coordinated international co-operation initiatives involving the judiciary, published Federal Court of Appeal and Federal Court decisions, and continued to administer the judicial appointment process on behalf of the Minister of Justice, including overseeing judicial advisory committee meetings.

In the past year, some new employees were added to our dedicated and professional team of officials, and I thank all of them for their continued support and efforts in providing quality and efficient service to the Canadian judiciary and public.

 

 

Marc A. Giroux
Commissioner

 

Results at a glance and operating context

 

What funds were used?

The department’s actual spending for 2019-20 was $628,057,984.

Who was involved?

The department’s actual full-time equivalents (FTEs) for 2019-20 were 62.

Key Results

ü  Provided support to the Independent Advisory Board for Supreme Court of Canada Judicial Appointments for Quebec Seats, mandated with providing non-binding merit-based recommendations to the Prime Minister on Supreme Court appointments for Quebec Seats and preparing the Honourable Nicholas Kasirer for his appointment to the Supreme Court of Canada.

ü  Provided orientation, guidance and support to the nine newly appointed Judicial Advisory Committees to ensure adherence to the Judicial Appointments process for new appointments and elevations to Canada’s superior courts.

ü  Created and implemented a compensation process to remunerate Judicial Advisory Committees members.

For more information on Federal Judicial Affairs’ plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

 

Results: what we achieved

Core Responsibility

 

Support to federally appointed judges

Description

To provide services and support to the federal judiciary in a manner which contributes to the independence of the judiciary and the confidence of Canadians in our judicial system.

Results

Federally appointed judges are provided with centralized services in a timely and effective manner

FJA continued to provide a high level of service to clients and achieve its service standards in terms of core services such as payment of judges’ salaries, allowances and annuities. Our Finance staff continued to conduct 100% verification of approximately 24,000 expense claims in order to maintain a low error rate in payments and exercise proper stewardship of public funds. Additionally, from an IT perspective we continued to maintain and provide judges with access to an internally supported email and communications platform (JUDICOM).

FJA’s Judges Language Training Program continued its mandate to provide language training to judges in both official languages and randomly assess the second official language proficiency of federal judicial candidates in order to strengthen bilingual capacity in the Superior courts. In order to do so, FJA has developed tools to assess candidates’ second official language skills. Information gathered through periodic consultations with teaching staff, classroom observations during immersion sessions, evaluation questionnaires completed by judges, and ongoing communications with judges in individual courses helped to update tailor-made learning materials and create new modules to promote the achievement of clientele objectives. The success of this program has resulted in federally appointed judges being more competent in presiding over hearings, understanding testimony, reading legal texts, drafting decisions, participating in legal conferences and making presentations in their second official language, thus enabling the judicial system to increase its bilingual capacity.

The Federal Courts Reports website was further improved upon in 2019-20. More specifically, a tool was implemented to facilitate faster downloads of large files (i.e. full volumes) and improve the user experience by adding functionalities to the full volumes. These new functionalities include a live table of contents and an integrated search engine. Communication channels between the Federal Courts Reports and Courts Administration Service remained open and the procedures were modified to facilitate the timely exchange of information. The principal human resources risk facing the Federal Courts Reports is the loss of expertise and corporate memory from the departure of experienced staff in specialized areas. The Federal Courts Reports has shown resilience in ensuring the continued production and timely publication (about once a month) of the Reports despite key absences; certain processes were modified and improved upon to increase efficiency in light of scarce resources.

With respect to Canadian judicial engagement in international activities, FJA continued to participate in the Support to Judicial Reform in Ukraine Project (SJRP), a five-year judicial reform project initiative funded by Global Affairs Canada (GAC) and implemented by both FJA and the National Judicial Institute (NJI). This project contributes to the advancement of democracy and the rule of law in Ukraine, thereby rebuilding confidence in judicial institutions.

The judicial appointments process is managed efficiently

During the 2019-20 fiscal year, nine new Advisory Committees were appointed. New Committees were provided with orientation and training to ensure adherence to the Judicial Appointments process.  During this reporting period, the Judicial Appointments Secretariat received 344 new applications, 235 of which were evaluated by the relevant Judicial Advisory Committee.  Further information regarding these applications is available on FJA’s website.

For each of the 84 appointments made during the 2019-2020 fiscal year, our staff was responsible for preparing the necessary supporting order-in-council and ministerial recommendation documentation. Further to securing permanent core funding to remunerate Judicial Advisory Committee members effective April 1, 2019, FJA created and implemented a compensation process to ensure members were remunerated in an efficient and timely manner.

The judicial conduct review process is completed in a timely and effective manner

During 2019-20, the Canadian Judicial Council (CJC) received 648 pieces of correspondence, resulting in 335 opened files (292 of which were processed and closed), representing a caseload of 87% of matters closed within 12 months. Of the closed files, 270 were reviewed and closed under early screening and 22 were reviewed and closed by a member of the Judicial Conduct Committee. Correspondence can include questions or comments relating to the justice system, as well as concerns about judicial conduct that warrant opening a file. 

 

CJC ensures that federally appointed judges have access to relevant training and learning opportunities

In 2019-20, the Council focused its efforts on enhancing transparency of judicial education, reforming the judicial conduct regime, improving access to justice through enhanced case management; and strengthening judicial independence.

In this reporting period, CJC’s main delivery partner, the National Judicial Institute (NJI), delivered 69 education programs to Canadian judges. In addition, a number of educational programs were delivered by other organizations or through informal learning sessions. Four (4) programs were joint programs delivered in partnership between the NJI and the Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice.  Also, a number of courts undertook informal training and learning events.

Results achieved

Departmental results

Performance indicators

Target

Date to achieve target

2017–18
Actual results

2018–19
Actual results

2019–20
Actual results

Federally appointed judges are provided with centralized services in a timely and effective manner

% of judges’ allowances processed within the 10-day service standard

At least 90%

March 2020

Over 90% of judges’ allowances were processed within the 10-day service standard

88% of judges’ allowances were processed within the 10-day service standard

98% of judges’ allowances were processed within the 10-day service standard

The judicial appointments process is managed efficiently

% of candidate applications ready to be evaluated within 3 months of reception

100%

March 2020

Over 95% of applications were screened and ready to be evaluated by Committees within 3 months of reception

Over 95% of applications were screened and ready to be evaluated by Committees within 3 months of reception

Over 95% of applications were screened and ready to be evaluated by Committees within 3 months of reception

The judicial conduct review process is completed in a timely and effective manner

% of complaints reviewed within six months

At least 80%

March 2020

80% of complaints were reviewed within six months

80% of complaints were reviewed within six months

80% of complaints were reviewed within six months

CJC ensures that federally appointed judges have access to relevant training and learning opportunities

% of judges who reported to the CJC that their training and learning needs were met

At least 90%

March 2020

Not available*

90% of judges reported to the CJC that their training and learning needs were met

90% of judges reported to the CJC that their training and learning needs were met

 

*This is a new indicator effective fiscal year 2018-19

 

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates

2019–20
Planned spending

2019–20
Total authorities available for use

2019–20
Actual spending
(authorities used)

2019–20
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)

614,659,819

614,659,819

630,793,978

627,331,184

12,671,365

 

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents

2019–20
Actual full-time equivalents

2019–20
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

60.5

56.5

(4)

 

Financial, human resources and performance information for Federal Judicial Affairs’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

 

Internal Services

 
Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: 

    ▶   Acquisition Management Services

    ▶   Communications Services

    ▶   Financial Management Services

    ▶   Human Resources Management Services

    ▶   Information Management Services

    ▶   Information Technology Services

    ▶   Legal Services

    ▶   Materiel Management Services

    ▶   Management and Oversight Services

    ▶   Real Property Management Services

 

Results      

In 2019-20, FJA internal services continued to provide the necessary support to the organization meeting its core mandate objectives as well as staying abreast of Government of Canada Wide initiatives in the areas of financial reporting, information management, IT and physical security and human resources.

FJA pay services were not transferred to the Miramichi Pay Centre and as such is a direct-entry organization employing a team of on-site pay advisors to manage the pay functions for FJA employees, federally appointed judges, retired federal judges and their survivors as well as compensation services to Judicial Advisory Committee members. The impact of the Phoenix pay issues has been relatively low compared to the rest of government. FJA’s managers are provided with advice and services in the areas of staffing, classification, labour relations, compensation, performance management and other human resources disciplines.

The main HR risk is the possible loss of expertise and corporate memory due to employee departures. FJA has continued to offer a good level of service considering the high level of staff turnover within the team (its ability to meet service standards has slightly decreased by approximately 10% as the hiring and training of new compensation advisors has created short delays). FJA continues to do succession and integrated HR planning to mitigate this risk.

The health and well-being of its employees continues to be a priority for the senior management team. Internally, FJA promoted LifeSpeak and EAP with campaigns, monthly newsletters and an all-staff information session. Many documents were added to the internal communications platform for all employees to see pertaining to the Employee Assistance Program and Wellness, Informal Conflict Management Services, Labour Relations, Performance Management, Political Activities and the Public Service Employee Survey.

From an Information Management perspective, FJA continued to host its own internal servers to provide secure and private communication services to federally appointed judges across Canada. This service allows for the establishment of discussion forums and email exchanges to safeguard the privacy and independence of the judiciary. The main risks the department faces in this area are the lack of information classification embedded within the department’s main IM system, the lack of formal retention policies and the availability and recoverability solution for the federal judges’ main digital collaboration system (JUDICOM). These will all be addressed in 2020-21.

 

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates

2019–20
Planned spending

2019–20
Total authorities available for use

2019–20
Actual spending
(authorities used)

2019–20
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)

726,800

726,800

726,800

726,800

0

 

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents

2019–20
Actual full-time equivalents

2019–20
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

5.5

5.5

0

 

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory spending) over time.


Budgetary performance summary for the core responsibility and internal services (dollars)

Core responsibility and internal services

2019–20
Main Estimates

2019–20
Planned spending

2020–21
Planned spending

2021–22
Planned spending

2019–20
Total authorities available for use

2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)

2018–19
Actual spending (authorities used)

2019-20
Actual spending (authorities used)

Administrative support to federally appointed judges

614,659,819

614,659,819

654,890,154

677,930,373

630,793,978

567,723,131

594,749,777

627,331,184

Subtotal

614,659,819

614,659,819

654,890,154

677,930,373

630,793,978

567,723,131

594,749,777

627,331,184

Internal Services

726,800

726,800

726,800

726,800

726,800

726,800

726,792

726,800

Total

615,386,619

615,386,619

655,616,954

678,657,173

631,520,778

568,449,931

595,476,569

628,057,948

 

The actual spending for the department shows a continual increase over the reporting periods resulting from the annual increase in judges’ salaries based on the Industrial Aggregate as provided for in the Judges Act, and an increase in the number of judges appointed to the bench and the number of pensioners receiving benefits under the Judges Act.

 

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for the core responsibility and internal services (full‑time equivalents)

Core responsibility and internal services

2017–18 Actual full‑time equivalents

2018–19 Actual full‑time equivalents

2019–20
Planned full‑time equivalents

2019–20 Actual full‑time equivalents

2020–21 Planned full‑time equivalents

2021–22 Planned full‑time equivalents

Administrative support to federal appointed judges

58.5

60.5

60.5

56.5

60.5

60.5

Subtotal

58.5

60.5

60.5

56.5

60.5

60.5

Internal Services

5.5

5.5

5.5

5.5

5.5

5.5

Total

64

60

66

62

66

66

 

Expenditures by vote

For information on Federal Judicial Affairs’ organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the  Public Accounts of Canada 2019–2020.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of Federal Judicial Affairs’ spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

Federal Judicial Affairs’ financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020, are available on the departmental website.

 

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020 (dollars)

Financial information

2019–20
Planned result
s

2019–20
Actual results

2018–19
Actual results

Difference (2019–20 Actual results minus
2019–20 Planned results)

Difference (2019–20 Actual results minus
2018–19 Actual results)

Total expenses

617,285,000

630,046,406

597,269,745

12,761,406

32,776,661

Total revenues

16,214,000

17,145,130

16,036,791

931,130

1,108,339

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

601,071,000

612,901,276

581,232,954

11,830,276

31,668,322

 

FJA’s future-oriented statement of operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020, is available on the FJA’s website.

The departmental Net cost of operations shows an increase of $31.7 million over the previous fiscal year. This increase is a result of a provision in the Judges Act that allows for an annual increase in salaries to judges based on the Industrial Aggregate and an increase in the number of pensioners receiving benefits under the Judges Act.

 

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2020 (dollars)

Financial Information

2019–20

2018–19

Difference
(2019–20 minus
2018–19)

Total net liabilities

258,227,780

246,844,677

11,383,103

Total net financial assets

3,726,022

4,301,787

(575,765)

Departmental net debt

254,501,078

242,542,890

11,958,188

Total non‑financial assets

171,185

220,956

(49,771)

Departmental net financial position

(254,330,573)

(242,321,934)

(12,008,639)

 

Net liabilities for 2019-20 are comprised primarily of $2.6 million in accrued liabilities and $255.6 million for the Judges’ Supplementary Retirement Benefits Account (SRBA). The SRBA is the pension plan for federally appointed judges which provides fully indexed annuities to judges and to all eligible survivors providing they meet minimum age and service requirements. Unlike other pension plans, the judges’ plan lacks an explicit accrual rate for benefits. Instead the full benefit amount is generally payable when the member has completed 15 years of pensionable service and the total of the member’s age and years of service total 80. The increase of $11.4 million in net liabilities over last fiscal year is fully attributable to the actuarial liability associated with the SRBA.

Additional information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable David Lametti, P.C., M.P.

Institutional head: Marc A. Giroux, Commissioner

Ministerial portfolio: Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Enabling instrument: Judges Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. J-1)

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1978

Other: Information about the Canadian Judicial Council, its mandate and programs are found at the Council’s website.

 

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

 “Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Federal Judicial Affairs’ website.

Mandate and role

FJA was created in 1978 under an Act of the Parliament of Canada to safeguard the independence of the judiciary and put federally appointed judges at arm's length from the Department of Justice. Our mandate extends to promoting the better administration of justice and providing support for the federal judiciary. The Judges Act provides for the designation of an officer called the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs. One of the roles and responsibilities of the Commissioner is to act on behalf of the Minister of Justice in matters related to the administration of Part I of the Judges Act.

FJA has an appointments secretariat which administers 17 advisory committees responsible for evaluating candidates under the superior courts judicial appointments process for federal judicial appointments and administering and supporting the new process for appointment of prothonotaries to the Federal Court. FJA also has the mandate to manage the Independent Advisory Board for Supreme Court of Canada Judicial Appointments process, established to assess candidates for appointment to the Supreme Court of Canada, as well as the Selection Process for Prothonotaries of the Federal Court.

FJA provides and maintains a secure on-line system (JUDICOM) to facilitate communication and collaboration amongst members of the Canadian federal judiciary.

In order to support the courts, FJA’s Language Training Program personnel develops and maintains a curriculum, which provides individual and group language training services in both official languages, thus enabling federally appointed judges to improve their second language proficiency and legal terminology, ensure that Canadians have access to justice in the official language of their choice.

Additionally, FJA coordinates initiatives with various government and non-government stakeholders related to the federal Canadian judiciary’s role in international cooperation.

The Federal Courts Reports section of FJA is responsible for selecting and publishing Federal Court of Appeal and Federal Court decisions in both official languages. Selected decisions undergo a thorough editorial process that includes copy editing and citation verification, the preparation of headnotes and captions, and translation accuracy confirmation.For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report.

 

Reporting Framework

Federal Judicial Affairs’ Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below.

Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory

Departmental Results Framework

Core Responsibility:
Administrative Support to Federally Appointed Judges

Internal Services

Departmental Result:
Federally appointed judges are provided with centralized services in a timely and effective manner

Indicator:
90% of judges’ allowances processed within the 10-day service standard

Departmental Result:
The judicial appointments process is managed efficiently

Indicator:
100% of candidate applications ready to be evaluated within 3 months of reception

Departmental Result:
The judicial conduct review process is completed in a timely and effective manner

Indicator:
80% of complaints reviewed within six months

Departmental Result:
CJC ensures that federally appointed judges have access to relevant training and learning opportunities

Indicator:
90% of judges who reported to the CJC that their training and learning needs were met

Program Inventory

Program: Payments pursuant to the Judges Act

Program: Canadian Judicial Council

Program: Federal Judicial Affairs

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for Federal Judicial Affairs’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Federal Judicial Affairs’ website:

    ▶   Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

    ▶   Gender-based analysis plus

 

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada

99 Metcalfe Street, 8th Floor

Ottawa, Ontario  K1A 1E3

Canada

Telephone: (613) 995-5140

Facsimile: (613) 995-5615

Email: info@fja-cmf.gc.ca

Web site: http://www.fja-cmf.gc.ca

 

Appendix: definitions

 

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a 3‑year period. Departmental Plans are usually tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental priority (priorité)

A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)

A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

A framework that connects the department’s core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)

The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works, for whom and in what circumstances. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.

full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full‑time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person’s collective agreement.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])

An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fighting climate change; Strengthening the Middle Class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative where two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)

Identifies all the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.

result (résultat)

A consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.


Endnotes